Bookish Thursdays: Drums of Autumn by Diana Gabaldon

Summary from GoodreadsIn this breathtaking novel—rich in history and adventure—The New York Times bestselling author Diana Gabaldon continues the story of Claire Randall and Jamie Fraser that began with the now-classic novel Outlander and continued in Dragonfly in Amber and Voyager. Once again spanning continents and centuries, Diana Gabaldon has created a work of sheer passion and brilliance…. It began at an ancient Scottish stone circle. There, a doorway, open to a select few, leads into the past—or the grave. Dr. Claire Randall survived the extraordinary passage, not once but twice. Her first trip swept her into the arms of Jamie Fraser, an eighteenth-century Scot whose love for her became a legend—a tale of tragic passion that ended with her return to the present to bear his child. Her second journey, two decades later, brought them together again in the American colonies. But Claire had left someone behind in the twentieth century—their daughter, Brianna…. Now Brianna has made a disturbing discovery that sends her to the circle of stones and a terrifying leap into the unknown. In search of her mother and the father she has never met, she is risking her own future to try to change history … and to save their lives. But as Brianna plunges into an uncharted wilderness, a heartbreaking encounter may strand her forever in the past … or root her in the place she should be, where her heart and soul belong….

I loved Drums of Autumn. Almost as much as I loved Outlander. Almost. Even though I didn’t love Voyager, I read Drums of Autumn because it was there and I felt compelled to keep reading Claire and Jamie’s story. I’m glad I did. Drums of Autumn restored my faith in the series and I am now quickly moving through The Fiery Cross.

Once again, Gabaldon delivers a strong novel about love, relationships and family.

This time the Frasers are in America – the new world. And what a fierce world it is. Claire and Jamie battle the political landscape, wilderness, poverty, and the knowledge that war will once again find them with ferocious courage and determination to make a good life for themselves.

Any romantic notions about time travel are quickly dissolved in this novel. Gabaldon paints a picture of a very hard life. The struggle to survive is the focus of each day. The constant preparation for long winters is exhausting. I wouldn’t last a month.

I loved Brianna’s journey in this book – both literal and metaphorical – and absolutely loved when she finally finds her parents and meets Jamie. The adventures in this book are vast and full of unexpected turns. My mouth fell wide open with shock at certain points and I just could not put the book down.

I thought Gabaldon did a nice job of developing Jamie and Brianna’s father/daughter relationship.  They disagree on most things; their views on life and gender are completely alien to one another due to being from wildly different centuries. Yet, the love they have for each other helps them to bridge the abyss no matter how unforgivable their actions may seem.

This book highlights new characters and conflicts that Jamie and Claire bravely face together. It also manages to maintain the deep love and romance between Jamie and Claire without being redundant or overly dramatic. I really loved the growth in Brianna’s character as well.

Drums of Autum was so much fun read. It was entertaining and had just enough romance, intrigue, violence and adventure to leave one fully satisfied and ready to read the next installment upon closing the book.

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Bookish Thursdays: Cinderella Ate My Daughter

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Summary from GoodreadsSweet and sassy or predatory and hardened, sexualized girlhood influences our daughters from infancy onward, telling them that how a girl looks matters more than who she is. Somewhere between the exhilarating rise of Girl Power in the 1990s and today, the pursuit of physical perfection has been recast as the source of female empowerment. And commercialization has spread the message faster and farther, reaching girls at ever-younger ages. But how dangerous is pink and pretty, anyway? Being a princess is just make-believe; eventually they grow out of it . . . or do they? In search of answers, Peggy Orenstein visited Disneyland, trolled American Girl Place, and met parents of beauty-pageant preschoolers tricked out like Vegas showgirls. The stakes turn out to be higher than she ever imagined. From premature sexualization to the risk of depression to rising rates of narcissism, the potential negative impact of this new girlie-girl culture is undeniable—yet armed with awareness and recognition, parents can effectively counterbalance its influence in their daughters’ lives.

I read this book in the summer…the beginning of the summer.  While I have forgotten many of the details of what I read, I do recall how it made me feel.

I encountered a spectrum of emotions actually. I can’t quite decide whether my first emotion was fear of the world in which I will raise my daughter or the all-encompassing “duh?” of what seems to be common sense…you know, like I know this stuff already because I’ve lived it and continue to live it every day.

I felt disarmed because Orenstein offers so much insight into a culture that I feel will swallow my daughter and I have no defense against it. As my dear friend (whom recommended this book) wisely reminded me (I’m paraphrasing here): “It is the crux of feminist social analysis…the problems are clearly laid out…but there never seems to be a solution”.

Once I grappled with this feeling of powerlessness and got a grip on my fear and self-righteousness, I devoured the book. It is thoroughly researched and each argument for and against girly-girl culture is well presented and supported. While my tendencies are feminist and I believe in raising my daughter with an empowered voice and sense of self, I am also the first to buy her a cute pink outfit with cute bow to match…I mean she has gorgeous creamy skin and dark silky hair…how can I not?!?

And there is the dilemma. Or the irony. Or whatever you want to call it…moms of this “post-feminist” (in quotations because can we ever really be post-feminist?), post-girl-power age have a fine line to walk. We understand the importance of looking our best and the danger of succumbing to media-fueled images of female sexuality. We understand that being true to ourselves does not always look like the cookie-cutter version of femininity. But how do we pass along this knowledge to our daughters and help them navigate the incessant messages of what they’re supposed to be in favour of just being who they are?

This book will not offer any solutions. Not a one. But it does clearly explain the root of the marketing machine and the power of the bottom-line in the hopes that our decisions for our daughters will at least be informed ones. More importantly, it really sends the message that your support and guidance are vital when she is making her own choices.

This a quick read that will get you thinking. I highly recommend it.

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Bookish Thursdays: The Husband’s Secret Fizzled Fast

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The-Husbands-Secret

Summary from Goodreads: At the heart of The Husband’s Secret is a letter that’s not meant to be read. My darling Cecilia, if you’re reading this, then I’ve died… Imagine that your husband wrote you a letter, to be opened after his death. Imagine, too, that the letter contains his deepest, darkest secret—something with the potential to destroy not just the life you built together, but the lives of others as well. Imagine, then, that you stumble across that letter while your husband is still very much alive. . . .Cecilia Fitzpatrick has achieved it all—she’s an incredibly successful businesswoman, a pillar of her small community, and a devoted wife and mother. Her life is as orderly and spotless as her home. But that letter is about to change everything, and not just for her: Rachel and Tess barely know Cecilia—or each other—but they too are about to feel the earth-shattering repercussions of her husband’s secret. Acclaimed author Liane Moriarty has written a gripping, thought-provoking novel about how well it is really possible to know our spouses—and, ultimately, ourselves.

**spoiler alert: I will implicitly allude to the conclusion of the novel and John Paul’s secret**

I finished this book a while ago, so this review will not be as thorough as I normally would like.

I could not write about The Husband’s Secret right away because I strongly disliked the ending and I didn’t want to let the book’s conclusion taint the rest of it…because I actually liked the book. Until the last 2 chapters. And the epilogue. If there was one epilogue that did not need to be written…it was the epilogue to The Husband’s Secret.

I really enjoyed the three different plots in the novel and was kept intrigued about how they would finally intersect. Cecilia, Tess and Rachel’s stories were all equally compelling for me. I liked the way Moriarty brought me into her characters’ most intimate thoughts, some of them not very flattering or appropriate. This made the characters real and easier to relate to. I didn’t necessarily like all the characters though. I found Cecilia annoying with her perfect life and Rachel is a tough one because she is so (understandably) bitter that she alienates her son.

Once the secret was finally revealed…I was not all that surprised…still, what does a person do if they discover such a monumental thing about their spouse? I don’t know. Cecilia’s near nervous breakdown makes sense. And how narcissistic is this guy who believes he can cover up his actions with self-punishment? That whole “don’t judge a book by its cover” cliche screams at you throughout this novel. It makes you actually wonder about that perfect family in your own neighbourhood…what kind of secrets are they hiding?

Ok, so now what? Secret revealed. Cecilia a mess. Rachel still angry. How does Tess fit into all this? She does in a roundabout way…which bothers me because what’s the point of her plot line? Really, you could take out Tess’ entire story and the plot would pretty much remain intact…why make her such a main character when she doesn’t really fit in?

Once Cecilia begins to live a chaotic, anxious life now that she holds the secret, you know that tragedy looms. Moriarty nicely creates so much tension that the book is ready to explode. And, it does. Oh, the tragedy! The least deserving person, the most innocent person is the one who falls victim to all of these characters’ flaws, faults and sins. I was speechless.

Alright. So the secret is finally revealed and Rachel knows the truth about John Paul. Cecilia knows the truth about Rachel. John Paul and Rachel are sorry and devastated by their actions. It is gut wrenching because both Rachel and John Paul have paid a very high price for their actions, but the question remains…is it enough? Should they be punished by law or is the guilty self-hatred they carry and their self-inflicted punishments enough? I wish I could decide.  Oh and once again, what does Tess have to do with this?

The answer is kind of in the epilogue. An epilogue which could have served as an outline for a whole other novel. The purpose of it is not lost on me. Moriarty wants to show us how split second decisions can affect an entire life…how one person’s universe can become topsy-turvy because of another’s actions (lack of)…except…I don’t want to know that John Paul’s secret is not really his secret. That there were other forces at work when he acted upon his anger…really? It made everything that happened in the novel so much more tragic and to a certain degree pointless.

Would I recommend this novel? Surprisingly, yes. You would think not because I’ve written pretty negatively about the conclusion, but I didn’t feel that way until the very end. I was absorbed by these characters and plot for almost the entire novel. Their stories and conflicts really drew me in. The book is easy to read and moves quickly. And, perhaps you may appreciate Moriarty’s presentation of the way life can completely alter it’s course because of the actions (or not) of people you know and people you don’t more than I did. Any book that makes me feel this strongly about how it ends is a worthy read.

Did you read The Husband’s Secret? Would love to read your thoughts!

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Bookish Thursdays: Reading The Husband’s Secret

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I’m on chapter 20 of 59. I thought I was moving right along and then I saw that there are 59 chapters! They go by quickly, but I’ve got a lot of plot left!

from kerryannmorgan.com

from kerryannmorgan.com

The Husband’s Secret is not at all what I expected. I thought I was in for light reading, but the circumstances of these characters are anything but light.

I love Moriarty’s narration so far. It is light. It is fun and easy. Yet, her characters experience great turmoil. Moriarty cleverly blends the darkness of very painful experiences with the lightness of every day routines and idiosyncrasies. It’s almost as if she’s making light of the characters…but she isn’t.

Having said that, it took me a while to get used to her narrative voice. I was really annoyed in Chapter 1 by how long it took for Cecilia to get to the letter…it went on and on about the Berlin Wall, and the Berlin Wall was a great analogy for the events opening the novel and I guess it captured Cecilia’s character quite nicely, but still…get on with it! When that was all finally over though, I was hooked.

I hate (love) the way each chapter ends with something I really want to keep reading about and the next chapter continues the story of another character (which I remember, oh yeah, I want to know about this too!)

And, THE SECRET. Oh, the secret! I finally discovered the secret and it wasn’t a complete shocker – but I didn’t expect it to be so…well, so coldly revealed. WTF, John-Paul?!? Can you IMAGINE finding out something like THAT about your husband? I really thought Cecilia would read it before seeing John-Paul which might have made for more dramatic tension. How do you ever look at the man the same way again?

I’m also very intrigued by Tess’ storyline…why oh why do Felicity and Will have to fall in love? Isn’t there another way to get Tess to Sydney than the betrayal of her husband and cousin/best friend?

I’m racking my brain trying to tie all the plots together. Right now it’s like one of the floor puzzles I do with my son. The pieces are large and obvious but I still can’t see how they come together. It’s driving me crazy! How does Tess fit into Janie’s murder? On what level is Connor responsible? What will Cecilia do? And, poor Rachel…

So far, I’m really enjoying The Husband’s Secret and am looking forward to seeing how it all falls into place, especially now that Cecilia knows the truth. What will she do

What are your thoughts on the book? If you’ve read past Chapter 20 – no spoilers please!

I hope to have it finished by next Thursday…unless life gets in the way 🙂

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Bookish Thursdays: Up Next, The Husband’s Secret

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from kerryannmorgan.com

from kerryannmorgan.com

Summary from Goodreads: At the heart of The Husband’s Secret is a letter that’s not meant to be read. “My darling Cecilia, if you’re reading this, then I’ve died…”

Imagine that your husband wrote you a letter, to be opened after his death. Imagine, too, that the letter contains his deepest, darkest secret—something with the potential to destroy not just the life you built together, but the lives of others as well. Imagine, then, that you stumble across that letter while your husband is still very much alive. . . .
Cecilia Fitzpatrick has achieved it all—she’s an incredibly successful businesswoman, a pillar of her small community, and a devoted wife and mother. Her life is as orderly and spotless as her home. But that letter is about to change everything, and not just for her: Rachel and Tess barely know Cecilia—or each other—but they too are about to feel the earth-shattering repercussions of her husband’s secret.  Acclaimed author Liane Moriarty has written a gripping, thought-provoking novel about how well it is really possible to know our spouses—and, ultimately, ourselves.

I cannot wait to dive into this book. Finally downloaded it to my e-reader and will start it. Today. (I hope). I don’t know much about Liane Moriarty, so I  googled her and came across her website. You can check it out here if you’re interested. She’s an Australian author. Her books are contemporary with characters and plots that are fun, interesting and thought-provoking.

I will be reviewing this in a few weeks (again, I hope). If you’re interested and would like to read along with me check back next Thursday for an update on where I am in the book, what I think of it so far and, of course, so I can read what you think of it too!

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Allegiant by Veronica Roth

allegiantSummary from Goodreads:  The faction-based society that Tris Prior once believed in is shattered—fractured by violence and power struggles and scarred by loss and betrayal. So when offered a chance to explore the world past the limits she’s known, Tris is ready. Perhaps beyond the fence, she and Tobias will find a simple new life together, free from complicated lies, tangled loyalties, and painful memories. But Tris’s new reality is even more alarming than the one she left behind. Old discoveries are quickly rendered meaningless. Explosive new truths change the hearts of those she loves. And once again, Tris must battle to comprehend the complexities of human nature—and of herself—while facing impossible choices about courage, allegiance, sacrifice, and love. Told from a riveting dual perspective, Allegiant, by #1 New York Times best-selling author Veronica Roth, brings the Divergent series to a powerful conclusion while revealing the secrets of the dystopian world that has captivated millions of readers in Divergent and Insurgent.

I liked Allegiant.  I didn’t devour it like I did Divergent and Insurgent.

Why?  Allegiant felt forced, too contrived, too long, too many plot points were resolved far too conveniently.  The concept was solid, however it was too 1984 and The Chrysalids and even A Brave New World…it borrowed from many classics…which is alright, I mean can you really reinvent a genre?  I also had a tough time buying that a sixteen year old girl could do what Tris does and behave as she does.  I bought it in the first two novels, but in this one it seemed a bit far-fetched (mind you, I totally bought what Katniss Everdeen does in The Hunger Games trilogy).

I also found that the characters didn’t grow.  I really enjoyed the evolution of major and minor characters in books one and two.  In book three all of the characters were stagnant.  They were stuck in this perpetual dead-end search for freedom, for a life that was ripped away from them, for peace – both inner and social.

It almost seemed as if Roth had more than one book left inside her and tried to mash it all into Allegiant. The plot didn’t read as tightly as the first two and I think that’s where she lost me.

At first I thought the dual first-person narrative was a great idea.  It was a chance to get into Tobias’ head, but after a while he and Tris sounded the same.

I like the creativity of the story and its comment on the effects of the pursuit of perfection (genetic perfection). I like the relationship between Tris and Tobias – she captures the insecurities and passion that drive teen love. The teens act too much like adults though.  On one hand it is understandable because they are forced to grow up quickly; on the other, it is not believable that they can be so in control of their feelings all the time.

Overall, if you have started this trilogy it is worth reading Allegiant to give the story a conclusion.  The book does provide a conclusion, it will not leave you hanging.  I liked the end of the book.  I thought it was appropriate given the nature of the characters.  I just don’t think it will be the same fast paced, continually changing, fun experience that the first two books in the trilogy offered.

Has the conclusion to a trilogy ever left you feeling less than excited?

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The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert

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I loved Eat, Pray, Love

Summary from Goodreads:  In The Signature of All Things, Elizabeth Gilbert returns to fiction, inserting her inimitable voice into an enthralling story of love, adventure and discovery. Spanning much of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the novel follows the fortunes of the extraordinary Whittaker family as led by the enterprising Henry Whittaker—a poor-born Englishman who makes a great fortune in the South American quinine trade, eventually becoming the richest man in Philadelphia. Born in 1800, Henry’s brilliant daughter, Alma (who inherits both her father’s money and his mind), ultimately becomes a botanist of considerable gifts herself. As Alma’s research takes her deeper into the mysteries of evolution, she falls in love with a man named Ambrose Pike who makes incomparable paintings of orchids and who draws her in the exact opposite direction—into the realm of the spiritual, the divine, and the magical. Alma is a clear-minded scientist; Ambrose a utopian artist—but what unites this unlikely couple is a desperate need to understand the workings of this world and the mechanisms behind all life. Exquisitely researched and told at a galloping pace, The Signature of All Things soars across the globe—from London to Peru to Philadelphia to Tahiti to Amsterdam, and beyond. Along the way, the story is peopled with unforgettable characters: missionaries, abolitionists, adventurers, astronomers, sea captains, geniuses, and the quite mad. But most memorable of all, it is the story of Alma Whittaker, who—born in the Age of Enlightenment, but living well into the Industrial Revolution—bears witness to that extraordinary moment in human history when all the old assumptions about science, religion, commerce, and class were exploding into dangerous new ideas. Written in the bold, questing spirit of that singular time, Gilbert’s wise, deep, and spellbinding tale is certain to capture the hearts and minds of readers.

I read The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert in a week.  That’s right, in 7 days.  For old, pre-motherhood me – this would be no surprise.  For me now? An absolute and utter reading feat!  I borrowed it from my public library for that length of time because it is a new release – and, so I took the plunge and read.

This is my first Gilbert fiction read.  I devoured Eat, Pray, Love (even sat through the movie…meh) and that is why I decided to try Gilbert’s return to fiction.

Immediate reaction?  It’s o-kay.  Not bad.  Interesting.

More thoughtful response? (Alert! There are a few, small spoilers…)

Gilbert is fantastic at creating characters.  From the stoic, determined Henry Whittaker to his equally stoic, bordering on robotic wife.  These two show disdain for any kind of emotional response, ever, to any situation.  Emotions make one weak.  Intelligence, rational thinking and reason are prized above all else – and they pass this along to their daughters, Alma and Prudence.

One of my favourite pieces of advice that Alma receives from both of her parents is never to explain herself for it makes her appear weak.  Strength is valued, controlling emotions is valued – these are the traits that will ensure success and self-preservation.  As in the natural world as well – this fact was not lost on this reader.

All of the characters in this novel are finely developed.  Their love of science, people, understanding, exploration is refreshing.  Always underlying every interaction, issue and development is the need to understand why and how.

When I read the summary I assumed that the love between Ambrose Pike and Alma Whittaker would be far more earth-shattering, if you will.  The romantic in me was disappointed. I wished for Alma to be more affected, perhaps more radically changed – more spiritually challenged.  I wished for Alma to have the most incredible sex of her life! There were so many things I wished for her and perhaps when they weren’t happening that’s when I felt let down and like I couldn’t keep reading.

This book was about 500 pages long and I was right there with the characters and plot until about page 390.  Alma goes to Tahiti in search of Ambrose and what it was he wanted, what it was he believed in.  I just couldn’t understand why.  I stopped caring.  I could not care less about any character or event than I did the 100 pages or so that Alma was in Tahiti.  I didn’t care about the Reverend, or Tomorrow Morning, or the village, or the kids, or the women, or Alma’s experiences.  I couldn’t get away from Tahiti fast enough.

And, then it just became a race to the end so I could return the book in the time frame allowed for new releases. I must admit that I skimmed the last 100 pages.  

Overall, this is an incredible story of how one very poor boy became a prince through science and pharmacology.  It’s crazy to see the sinister beginnings of how pharmaceutical companies profit from illness.  It is also a fascinating story about science and women’s contribution to the natural sciences.  It is so thoroughly researched that the reader feels like she is truly experiencing moments in history when scientific discovery was changing the way people lived.  It is also the story of a brilliant woman who reasons, who believes in fact and investigation and ends up sacrificing so much of her womanhood because of it.

Is it a sacrifice?  Is sexual, sensual, emotional, passionate expression/understanding a necessary part of being a woman?  I always thought so and have related to characters who think so/do so too.  Perhaps this is why I found Alma so challenging.  Alma is all mind and tries to reason her heart…when she gives into her heart she ends up being burned. Badly.  And, then becomes obsessed with discovering why and how she was burned.  I admired Alma, but found it very difficult to relate to her.

Would I recommend this book?  Yes.  Why?  Because Elizabeth Gilbert writes beautifully.  Her characters are flawless and her plot (regardless of how I reacted to it) is pretty tight.  And, it’s a pretty fascinating subject too.

I just wish Alma had had great sex…I’m sure it would’ve changed everything 🙂

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Review: The Lightbearers by Nora M. Garcia

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I was asked by the author to read and review The Lightbearers for this blog.  It was my second time reading a self-published work  – and, I truly wish to support every author who decides to self-publish because the traditional route is wrought with difficulty and let’s face it…it is so difficult to break in.

Nonetheless, I think any author who is going to publish a work must do so without hurry; they should fine tune their craft and find a great editor who will help them to seamlessly bring together a believable story.

Now, onto my thoughts on the novel in question.

Will be interviewing author for this one!

At its core, The Lightbearers has a great concept.  It is highly creative and weaves interesting aspects of ancient Egypt and its people into the modern era.  Garcia creates distinct characters who clearly want different things.

I really wanted to like this book.  But, I had so much trouble with it.  The exposition felt confusing and disorganized – I feel that Garcia was going for intrigue and perhaps trying to hook her readers – but I felt annoyed that the motivation of the characters presented was not made clear.  The character descriptions felt more like character sketches – seems that Garcia fell into the trap of telling her readers about her characters instead of showing her characters.  There were too many interruptions in the plot to describe a character or to provide back story to the present events.  It almost seemed as if the novel should have started at a different point in time.

The mission of the lightbearers, their purpose and goals wasn’t made clear early enough in the novel – and even when made clear, I found the description of humanity pretty condescending.  What is it that the lightbearers are saving humanity from?  Government? Capitalism? Materialism? Religion? Their own selfishness and greed?  We never truly know!  Nor are we convinced that humanity needs saving. There’s just one really despicable man who conveniently gets away with everything because he’s wealthy enough to pretty much buy everyone…because every police officer, educational leader, social/cultural leader and politician is for sale.

I liked the isolated stories of how the lightbearers started (ancient Egypt), of when they reincarnated in France and even Jerusalem (Jesus’ story)…but these stories were superfluous – the plot was not affected in any way whatsoever by these stories.  There was no thematic link to the main plot either except to show that the lightbearers have done this before.  They decide when/where to incarnate, live out their life, try to change (bring light to) humanity and die trying without changing all that much.

I really disliked the sharp turns the book takes.  They are unnecessary…the protagonists die, then the characters that become protagonists die, then the antagonist becomes the protagonist and ruins people’s lives, then the lightbearers return as different people (more character descriptions!) and then they die…the plot twists didn’t feel fluid or logical.

I read every page waiting for the wow moment.  Waiting for the moment that it would all just work and I wouldn’t feel so guilty about my opinion of it.  It never happened.

The plot is poorly developed, it makes jumps that are unrealistic and messy situations are too neatly/easily wrapped up.  The entire things reads like a draft – not a final, polished, finely edited and written version.

I feel I need to remind my readers that I am a fan of fantasy and historical fiction.  I read YA dystopian novels and some pretty far-reaching romance novels.  I am very good at suspending reality and buying into the world an author creates for me – but in The Lightbearers there are too many holes in that world where I fell through and couldn’t climb back in.  

My issues with the novel remained the same – beginning to end.  Unfortunately, due to my opinion of the book, Garcia chose not to conduct the author interview on Book Marks – which I understand.  I gave her the option and told her my opinion beforehand.

The Lightbearers is a good attempt, but it didn’t quite do it for me.  I can’t say I would recommend this book to anyone.  Bummer start to my Bookish Thursdays, but there it is.

Have you read any books that tried really hard to like and just couldn’t?

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Top Ten Character Names

I know it’s NOT Tuesday! It’s Saturday!  A busy day has left me too exhausted to think or research/prepare a post for NaBloPoMo.

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish.  I hadn’t participated in a long time and wanted to again.  So, I wrote this post 2 weeks in advance – and then forgot to post it!  Since today was super busy, and I had little time to really blog I dug into my drafts and found this one.  I like it, so I’ll post it.

The Broke and the Bookish requested a list about character names I love or unusual character names for Tuesday Oct 15 I believe it was…in any case, here is my list:

  1. Hermione Granger from Harry Potter – for the longest time I mispronounced her name…unique and unforgettable
  2. Katniss Everdeen from The Hunger Games – great way to get a short form of Kat without the traditional Catherine…quick, clever, fiercely independent
  3. Scarlett O’Hara from Gone with the Wind – a name as sweeping and romantic as the book
  4. Lavender Brown from Harry Potter– a minor character but the name is just too cute and an interesting take on names taken from nature
  5. Blanche Dubois from A Streetcar Named Desire – is there a better example of symbolism through character name?
  6. Atticus Finch from To Kill A Mockingbird – self explanatory.
  7. Lisbeth Salander from The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo – an unassuming name for a very dangerous girl.
  8. Portia from The Merchant of Venice – although I’m not a huge fan of this Shakespearean play, she is a great character and her name is just as strong
  9. Elizabeth Bennett from Pride and Prejudice – classic.
  10. Katsa & Po from Graceling– too cute and love how deadly they are.

What’s your favourite character name?  Answer below or on your own blog and add it to the meme at The Broke and The Bookish.

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WWW Wednesdays

shouldbereading.wordpress.com asks three questions every week for WWW Wednesdays.  Check out the blog for MizB’s responses.  I think it’s a good, quick way to keep readers updated on what’s going on in my reading world.  Here are my answers:

What are you currently reading? I’m on page 140 of 259 of The Lightbearers by Nora M. Garcia 

What did you recently finish?  Voyager by Diana Gabaldon – read review here.

What do you think you’ll read next? I hope to continue with Allegiant by Veronica Roth and so continue my Fall TBR.  

Wanna play along?  Send me your answers to these questions or answer them at shouldbereading.wordpress.com